BlazBlue: Chrono Phantasma Review

And in your darkest hour, I hold secrets flame

Doubt. It’s all Ragna the Bloodedge can think about. He’s been granted the nigh-limitless power of the magical Azure Grimoire, and he’s used it quite effectively. He’s known and feared as a one-man army, capable of bringing an entire corrupt government to its knees. After all this time, Ragna is still on the run. The Librarium and its military – along with just about everyone else – is out for his head. He knows he has to keep fighting, but why? Where is all this leading? For what and whom is he fighting? Was all this murder and mayhem necessary? Does he even comprehend the powers he possesses – or their consequences? He needs to figure this stuff out fast, because he’s unknowingly become an important part of a plan that could save or doom reality itself.

Ragna’s character arc is just one of many aspects of Chrono Phantasma’s storyline. It picks up not long after the previous BlazBlue; all sides and factions involved have put their endgames into motion, and it’s just a matter of who can outsmart the other. No longer content with scheming behind the scenes, Hazama and Relius Clover have taken center stage and are on the verge of destroying the world. Kokonoe and rest of the Sector Seven group are desperately trying to counteract them, to the point of joining an ever-growing militia of Librarium dissenters and attempting a coup d’état from within. Major Tsubaki has succumbed to the maddening influence of her weapon, and it won’t be long before she hunts down and slaughters her former allies and friends. The Six Heroes – the ones responsible for most of the game’s backstory – gear up for what will ultimately be the ending of their storyline. Within the ruins of Ikaruga, Bang Shishigami is about to discover the true nature of his powers. Hidden somewhere in the middle of all of the chaos, a young woman is being groomed to be a savior.

Needless to say, there’s a lot going on. As the third game in the series, Chrono Phantasma is burdened with continuing and resolving several dangling plot threads. For the most part, it pulls it off spectacularly. The Story Mode divides chapters amongst the main characters, the Six Heroes, and Sector Seven by way of a streamlined and branching display. It’s not nearly as tedious to finish as those of the previous games, which practically required a guide to get full completions. The hours of dialogue, twists, and joke endings are still present and accounted for. However, not everyone got the same amount of attention; Continuum Shift was mostly about Jin, Makoto, Litchi, and Hazama’s development, so they aren’t in focus as much this time. The new characters were treated even worse; Azrael, a nigh-unstoppable killing machine, serves as a dangerous but ultimately secondary threat to the heroes. Bullet, the badass mercenary with a chip on her shoulder, gets a handful of scenes before being forgotten. Amane, despite his flamboyant fighting style, has only a few vague encounters that set him up as a key figure for the next game. Only Kagura, the leader of the Librarium rebel forces, gets a decent amount of screen time. While it makes sense for the story to resolve an already massive narrative, the newcomers deserved better introductions.

They steal the show in Arcade Mode, though. BlazBlue has always enjoyed a relatively small but diverse character roster, and Chrono Phantasma adds plenty of variety. Azrael’s brutal punch and kick combos are quite satisfying to pull off. Amane looks beautiful with his kimono and flower petals, but his deadly shawl and drill powers are reminiscent of Guilty Gear’s Eddie. Kagura’s stance-based swordplay is like a 2D version of Soul Calibur’s Siegfried. Kokonoe is finally a playable character (albeit as DLC), but the inventions and gimmicks built into her attacks make her unbelievably broken. Izayoi (Tsubaki’s powered-up alternate ego) is more manageable, but can chain attacks ridiculously well. Bullet is the only uninteresting one; her speedy, grapple-based moveset doesn’t leave much of an impression. She feels more like a fighter designed solely for fan service. It would’ve made more sense to have Jubei – an important secondary character established since the first game – tossed into the fray. Everyone else from Continuum Shift is back in action, complete with the usual assortment of rebalances and tweaks to their movesets.

The fundamental gameplay mechanics haven’t changed much. Rather than using the weak, medium, and strong attacks seen in most fighting games, BlazBlue assigns the buttons as A, B, C, and D. An A attack might be a quick jab or kick, while a C move could result in a slash or stomp. Depending on the directional inputs, those basic moves could change into uppercuts, aerial slashes, dive kicks, throws, and everything in between. The D button focuses on the characters’ unique powers and techniques. For example, Amane’s shawl can chip through defenses and wreak havoc on blocking opponents. Azrael doesn’t just beat his enemies; he puts weak points on their bodies that add staggering and extra combo properties to his attacks. Such special moves are the cornerstone of each character’s playing style, so you’ll have to learn them well.

That goes double for the more complex combat mechanics. Much like its predecessors, Chrono Phantasma is an incredibly demanding game in terms of technical skill. You can mash the A-D buttons until your fingers go raw, but you won’t stand a chance against a high-leveled AI or decently-trained opponent. Aside from the plethora of super attacks, move cancels, blocks, counters, dashes, tactical rolls, wake-up recoveries, there’s more emphasis on guard breaking and energy meter management. There’s a ton of stuff to learn, and the extensive tutorial that breaks everything down step by step. The Training Mode lets you customize and record your sessions, giving you some much-needed opportunities to get the basics down. Each character also has a set of challenges, which focus on linking attacks and perfecting the timing on your inputs. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, you can switch to the Stylish control option and let loose some pre-programmed combos. Once you’ve gotten a handle on everything, the gradually increasing difficulty of the Abyss and Score Attack Modes ought to give you a decent run for your money. But if you think you’ve truly mastered everything (or you’re a gaming masochist), the Unlimited Mars Mode pits you against a gauntlet of super-powered versions of each character, set to the highest difficulty level. It’s definitely for the hardcore players; if you just think you know how to play, you probably won’t survive a single round.

If you want something a little less soul-crushing, the multiplayer is a better choice. There’s the usual assortment of ranked and player matches, complete with search functions for skill level, area, connectivity, etc. You can customize your profile with character icons, messages, and decorations. If you don’t want to spend time reading through a list of potential opponents, you can submit your profile for a match, then enjoy the other game modes. When someone else wants to play, you’ll just get a pop-up message offering a fight. It’s pretty handy when you don’t want to sit around waiting for other gamers to show up. If you prefer a more direct approach, you can use the game’s online lobby. Rather than giving you a bland assortment of menus and brackets, you’re granted an 8-bit avatar and whisked away into a virtual arcade where you can text with and challenge anyone inside. It looks ridiculous and ugly, but at 64 players per room, no one’s going to care about the aesthetics. The lack of voice chat and YouTube replay connectivity are disappointing, though. The fights, however, are an entirely different matter. The BlazBlue series has always had great netcode, but Chrono Phantasma has a few kinks that need working out. The matches occasionally suffer some lag, which doesn’t bode well for the technically demanding gameplay. Choosing an opponent from the ranking list is hit or miss at best, and the profile stats don’t always update correctly. Hopefully these issues can be rectified in the coming weeks.

At least the visuals keep you distracted. The universe of BlazBlue is a gorgeous, vibrant, and often bizarre work of art. Arakune is a gigantic, disgusting blob of slime, but his fluid animations puts most 2D characters to shame. You can practically feel the weight when Noel hefts up her cannon for a super attack. Azrael’s aura not only absorbs projectiles, but gives him an intimidating, blood-red glow. That’s aside from all the character-specific intros and mid-fight banter; those little details show just how much attention and effort was put fleshing the fighters out. Since the story takes place in a different city, there’s a nice assortment of new backgrounds. There’s something strangely fitting about fighting Jin Kisaragi – the deranged master of swords and ice – in the middle of a peaceful, snow-covered village. The soundtrack is more familiar with its remixes of certain themes (Taokaka’s Catus Carnival II theme is amazing on the violin), but the blend of classical and metal may not be for everyone. Nor will the updated voice acting; the new Bang sounds great, but longtime fans will notice the difference immediately. That’s just a minor point, though. The amount of talent and effort put into making these characters come alive is far more than what most fighting games can muster.

It’s about time. The BlazBlue series started on the PS3, so it’s only appropriate it’d be one of the last fighters to send it off. As the third game in the series, Chrono Phantasma has some tough acts to follow. For the most part, it succeeds. Parts of the lengthy story finally reach their conclusion, allowing the narrative the foundation it needs for the next inevitable installment. Aside from a few missteps, the newcomers are awesome and add plenty to an already diverse cast. The basic gameplay mechanics are unchanged, but the sheer amount of techniques and skills needed to master this game are almost overwhelming. The detailed training and brutally difficult modes ought to keep seasoned players interested. The simplified control mode keeps things accessible for everyone else. Though the multiplayer still has a few things to sort ought, it’s still fun to play. Chrono Phantasma might be a fine ending to the trilogy, but BlazBlue won’t be over any time soon.

Originally posted here.

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One thought on “BlazBlue: Chrono Phantasma Review

  1. This is a solid, fair review. However… well, CP is known for its rather messy story mode and portrayals of some characters. Maybe it’s because Mori was like “Oh yeah, CP is going to be the end of this arc”, and when working on the game, he ends up being like “Oh crap, it’s bigger than I thought, we have to separate it to two more games!”. Some other characters aren’t even treated better. So… Arakune is just a cannon fodder, Taokaka just went poof in the middle of story. Less time for humors unless it’s the gag reel.

    Of course, what I would consider its more questionable direction in the Story Mode is how they handled Litchi. Despite what you said, she actually gets a bit more development, although the direction may be a little questionable and makes it vague on where she’s going. For the sake of the poor readers that haven’t been spoiled, I will separate this in a LONG spoilers mark.
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    SPOILERS ALERT
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    Basically at the start of the Sector Seven story, we are shown about how she truly felt about going to work with bastards like Relius and Hazama: She was never a big fan of their plans or their goals about ‘world destruction’, she just wants their brain and knowledge about how to cure Lotte. When she heard that Relius sicced Arakune to Ikaruga, Litchi finally gets fed up and quits being his assistant, and contemplates on going back to Kokonoe, only to find that Kokonoe wants to haul her back to Sector Seven for… something. Trials of betrayal or something. Litchi gets pissed off, but relents when it turns out Relius and Hazama sent Nu to haul her back to NOL. She managed to escape thanks to help of Kagura, and after revealing Relius’ plans, Kokonoe exchanges it with another thing she knew about saving Lotte: “Nope, it’s still not what you want. He can’t be fully saved. DEAL WITH IT.” And when they interrupt Relius again, Relius pretty much taunts Litchi for ragequitting her deal about saving Arakune, and reveals that if his plan was to succeed, there’d be a new world where she could prevent the thing that caused Lotte to turn into Arakune.

    Sector 7 story ended there. The unwary ones would think this was an ongoing event with the main story, so when suddenly Litchi reappears in the CP climax and being more of a subservient servant of Relius who is ‘totally’ in the idea of ‘Let’s blow up this world and make a new one so there’s Lotte alive over there.’… Ooh boy, this is where the shitstorm starts. A lot of people starts thinking that she completely lost any semblance of sympathy and pretty much deserves to burn, especially after the ultimate end in regards of Relius’ boss… Especially rather jarring because she joined the good guys at first, then switched back to being a bad guy just because of ‘lover/grief’ problem and ‘too obsessed with seithr/blob boyfriend’.

    There is, however, an implication that could be easily lost: That the Sector 7 and Six Heroes stories were all alternate timelines that got resetted by Master Unit Amaterasu. The difference’s there: In Six Heroes’ story, Hakumen finally banished Phantom. However, in main story, Phantom is alive and well, whacked Jubei and eventually Hakumen. By this, if Sector 7 story wasn’t resetted, Litchi would continue being a good guy. However, it was time-reset, and Litchi has a quirk people forgot: She is capable of viewing what happens to her alternate selves. So if she has that, and was able to learn what happens in the Sector 7 story, it could be easier to digest that Litchi realized that ragequitting that quick isn’t productive for her goals (because really, Kokonoe still won’t help, and Relius back then would be free to abuse Arakune without her consent), and she has to play the subservient servant part a bit longer, especially true that because she knows that power-level wise, she’d be a B-Lister. What’s true regardless was that when Carl finally offered to join up with Relius, Litchi was actually flabbergasted. If she really hates this world that she’s into Relius’ plan, why would she plead against having more help?

    In a way, perhaps it is Mori’s way to show that Litchi all in all is still the Tragic Heroine/Anti Villain that she showed to be in the Arcade Mode. There are some who understood that, and still likes her as a story-character, not just as a player character you can use and play in the game, and very much sympathizes with her. But to some, they probably wouldn’t even bother, because they are probably too intoxicated with what Hazama and Relius entails to the world, and maybe thinking that “You have got to be out of your mind to willingly help them.” Lots of factors clashing together, people not getting whether she’s still sympathetic or not…

    Litchi, to me, remains as one of my great favorites, and I am wondering if I could get your opinion/analysis about her. Deep down, though, I kinda hoped that you’re still holding your sympathy on her. What she did is definitely wrong and must be stopped, but I think it’s very understandable. More also likely because her life after losing Lotte is pretty much a representation of the Five Stages of Grief, and she’s basically on the Depression stage (fourth stage) at this point.

    Looking forward to exchange arguments with you in a healthy way.
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    END SPOILERS

    (P.S: Seeing that you occasionally tag your posts with TV Tropes, I’ll have to warn you: I’m… kind of notorious as a Litchi fan in that site. My handle name… ChrisX.)

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