Early Summer In Oahu

Hey, folks! I’m baaaaack!

*Cue crickets chirping*

Ahem. Sorry I’ve been gone so long. Aside from being on the trip, my “vintage” 2011 laptop finally died on me a while ago. I didn’t lose anything incredibly important, but finding a new, affordable machine and starting over after so long has been rather time-consuming. Between that and the work schedule, I haven’t had much free computer time lately. Anyways. As mentioned a little while ago, I got the opportunity to visit Oahu. It was my third time in Hawaii (longtime readers will recall my trips in 2014), but this was first time visiting this particular island. I went in almost completely blind; the only thing I knew was that people surfed at Waikiki, Pearl Harbor was there, Honolulu was a major city, and the name “Diamond Head.” Unlike the last two islands, Oahu was supposedly ultra modern and lacked their wonderfully epic natural landscapes. As someone who likes adventuring on vacations, I went into this ready for disappointment.

Man, was I wrong.

Getting to Oahu was mostly uneventful. Just another lengthy ride to the far end of the BART system, and then checking out luggage. The security lines were thankfully brief – only about 30 minutes – despite numerous warnings about increasing wait times on the news. However, I didn’t get past the TSA entirely unscathed; a young lady patted down my hair! Seriously, I’ve had my pants and shoes checked. But my hair? Well, I suppose it is thick and long enough to conceal a knife, but that would’ve been picked up by the metal detectors. Guess I should just be glad security was on point, and leave it at that.

The first thing that struck me was how much Oahu was like to the Bay Area. Not in terms of scale or weather, but something far more mundane: traffic. Seriously, the drive out of Honolulu was like getting through Interstate 80 on an average weekend. Six lanes, countless speeders, and hilly terrain could’ve easily been mistaken for parts of the East Bay. I knew it would be busier than the Big Island (easily the most relaxing driving in Hawaii), but this felt like I’d never left California. The local amenities probably had something to do with it; before heading to the hotel, we stopped at a nearby shopping area and had Panda Express for lunch. Because nothing says exotic vacation meals like eating Asian fast food that you could easily get back at home. It makes sense; Hawaii is an American state, so of course it would have common fast food and grocery franchises. Given that our room didn’t come with a kitchen this time (we only got a studio as opposed to a villa) shopping for cheap and easy meals became a running theme for the week.

Much like our last venture to Hawaii, this one essentially became a road trip. Choose a destination the night before, sleep, wake up, get ready, stay out all day, eat dinner, come back, wash up, choose the next destination, rinse and repeat. I was once again the navigator of our group – the old GPS couldn’t handle Hawaiian address numbering – eternally tasked with riding shotgun, reading the map, and improvising routes whenever necessary. Our first stop was Manoa Falls, the highest waterfall on Oahu. Getting there involved a drive past most of Honolulu, stopping at a farmer’s market (paltry compared to that of Hilo), stumbling across the local Safeway, and wandering around a few residential streets. We nearly turned back due to the rainy weather, then realized how pointless that would’ve been; the trail to the falls is a 1.5-mile trek through the rainforest. It’s called such for a reason. We weren’t going to stay dry, no matter what day we hiked. It’s not like this was our first time, either; after hiking similar terrain on Maui and the Big Island, we came prepared with long sleeves, ponchos, insect repellent, etc.

What we weren’t prepared for was the mud.

Under normal circumstances, 1.5 miles is nothing to me. I walk more than that on my daily commute. The hill I live on is steeper than anything that was on that trail. But when it’s pouring rain, all bets are off. I saw able-bodied people of all ages – including small children – slip and slide multiple times, and I managed to utterly wreck my cargo pants along the way. It was worth the effort, though; the Manoa Falls Trail is absolutely brimming with beautiful scenery. Lush vegetation on all sides, a stream drifting through crowds of mossy rocks, and even a huge bamboo thicket. Manoa Falls itself was rather underwhelming; yes, it was tall and had a pool at its base, but that’s a far cry from the majestic scale of Akaka Falls and other natural wonders of the Big Island. Nevertheless, it was a unique – if messy – experience. If you have any interest in hiking and want something relatively easy, definitely give this a try.

That goes double for Pearl Harbor. It’s common understanding that when you go to Oahu, you visit Pearl Harbor. It’s like visiting the Statue of Liberty in New York, Alcatraz in San Francisco, etc. It’s what you do. We decided to tackle this part of the trip as soon as we could. Like on most parts of Hawaii, weather is inconsistent at best. Since part of the Pearl Harbor tour includes a boat ride out to the USS Arizona Memorial, the weather could make or break the trip. Monday morning was hot and sunny, so we immediately hopped in the car and sped back into the city. The place was packed, of course; people come from all over the world to see these remnants of the old war. Parking wasn’t horrendous, but the prospect of theft certainly was. Despite having cops on patrol and being well-maintained, there were multiple signs warning tourists of car break-ins. We brought everything we could and hoped the rest would remain there.

Before taking the boat out to the USS Arizona, tourists have to get tickets, stand in line, and sit in an auditorium. The staff turns on a short film that gives an abridged version of the events leading up to and the attack on Pearl Harbor itself. It’s a nice, brief piece of educational programming (I’m fairly certain it was narrated by Oprah), especially for children or people not well-versed in 20th century history. The ride to the Arizona was crowded, but organized. The memorial itself was almost elegant in its simplicity: a large, curved, white rectangular walkway that stood just over the sunken ship, with multiple open-air arches for people to gaze at the wreckage. Hunks of rusted metal jutted a few feet above the waterline, a stark contrast to the otherwise gorgeous scenery. 75 years later, oil still occasionally leaks to the surface. The wall at the far end of the memorial was actually a massive shrine that listed the names of dead. Despite having so many visitors, the memorial was surprisingly quiet. When it was time to get back on the ferry, I made sure to sit at the very back and take a few more fleeting photos of American history.

The rest of the visit was relatively unremarkable. We didn’t bother taking any more tours. I took a few exterior shots of the USS Bowfin, as well as a torpedoes, propellers, an antiaircraft assembly, and other artifacts. One of the more interesting exhibits was the conning tower from the USS Parche; you could climb inside, look at all the little buttons and gauges, all while trying to ignore the thick, oily stench. After stocking up on souvenirs and some free guidebooks, we left Pearl Harbor and headed for downtown Honolulu. Our next stop was Iolani Palace, former residence of Hawaii’s royal family. Getting there was a little tricky, though. Aside from road construction, traffic, and parking, we tried using the GPS navigator and ended up driving into the United States Pacific Command by mistake. The armed guard at the entrance was very understanding, though he held onto our IDs until we did a U-turn. Now we’re probably on some list!

Despite its historical significance, Iolani Palace was far less crowded than Pearl Harbor. There were about 20 people in our group, and we were given a self-guided tour via portable headsets and digital maps. By no means was this the most extravagant building I’ve ever visited – nothing will ever beat Versailles in terms in sheer opulence – but Iolani Palace was a work of art in of itself. Its building materials were mostly imported: slate from Pennsylvania, wood from the Pacific Northwest, and metalwork and engraved glass windows from San Francisco. The grand staircase at the entrance and much of the interior was made of koa, a Hawaiian tree species. Artifacts on display spanned multiple countries, most notably sets of vases, paintings, and statues from the English, French, Indian, and Chinese governments. Much of the furniture is still in great condition; the old throne room practically glitters, and everything in the aptly-named Blue Room is cast in a rich, dark shade. The palace used to be lit by gas chandeliers, until King Kalakaua met Thomas Edison and saw electrical lights in Paris. When combined with the in-house telephone, heated water, personal library, and other amenities, it’s clear that the king enjoyed the elegance, but was striving for modernity as well. While he must have made quite an impression with the outside world, his success didn’t last. After he died, his sister was imprisoned, overthrown, and replaced by a provisional government in 1893. Despite the political fallout (President Cleveland was anti-imperialist), Hawaii was eventually annexed five years later. Needless to say, the road to Hawaii’s inclusion into the United States was far from perfect.

What was perfect, however, was the evening we later spent at Waikiki. It was late in the day, and we didn’t want to have to deal with Oahu’s infamous rush hour, so we decided to wait it out at the island’s most popular beach. Looking back, I get why Waikiki is so famous; the waves are big, the sand is decent, and the sunsets are spectacular. The problem is that it’s too popular. The streets are congested with traffic and pedestrians for several blocks, it’s noisy, cluttered, and seemingly every inch of beach is covered with a towel, sunbather, or surfboard. It’s nearly impossible to walk along parts of that beach without accidentally stepping on someone. Also, the parking is atrocious; even if you find a public parking spot, it’ll cost you a 25 cents for every 10 minutes. Even if you max out the meter, you’ll still only get 2 hours. Imagine going to one of the coolest beaches on Earth, but having to constantly check your watch to ensure you’ll make it back in time. We walked on the paved sidewalk running parallel to the beach for a few blocks, then stopping for dinner at the local McDonald’s (Fun fact: the Waikiki branch gives you free pineapple slices with their Extra Value Meals), before making a run back to the car. After buying a few more minutes, I walked to the tip of the Kapahulu Groin (AKA Waikiki’s famous pier) and stayed long enough to photograph a few surfers and an absolutely gorgeous sunset. Waikiki was definitely worth the headache of getting there!

The next day, we decided to keep things a little more low-key. No major tourist attractions, just a good, old-fashioned road trip around Oahu’s eastern tip. Interstate H-3 is by far the most beautiful freeway on the island. Incredible landscapes, relatively simple navigation (it’s essentially a huge circle), far less traffic. It also has some of the most underrated beaches in Hawaii. With its white sands and bright blue water, Kailua Beach Park was almost blinding under the midday sun. While there were plenty of picnickers and sunbathers, it was a far cry from the hordes of tourists at Waikiki. Waimanalo Beach Park down the road had even fewer people, just a couple of families enjoying a beach that looked more like a water color painting. Makapu’u Beach had slightly more visitors, just some tourists and photographers enjoying the crashing waves and extensive tide pools. That’s aside from the iconic lighthouse nearby, which also serves as a landmark and trail marker.

Traffic started picking up around Halona Blowhole; dozens of people eagerly flocked to the observation deck, only to discover the tide was out. There was a beach hidden beneath the cliffs next to the lookout, and several people climbed down despite the warning signs. Our last – and arguably best – stop was the Lanai Lookout. It wasn’t anything special at first glance, just a parking lot overlooking some cliffs. But if you climb over the concrete and down the cliff, you’ll see some of Oahu’s most beautiful natural wonders. It’s as if someone had carved the cliffs into jagged layers of cooled lava, then completely covered them with splashes and swirls of paint. When you go down far enough, you’ll realize that one whole section of the cliff is obscured from the roadside view; you can slowly, carefully make your way all the way down to the rocky shoreline, inhabited only by a handful of fishermen and massive, thundering waves. Had it not been so late in the day, I would’ve sat on those cliffs for hours.

Unfortunately, we were on a schedule that evening. Our resort was showing its weekly luau, and we’ve kind of made a tradition of going to one every time we visit Hawaii. Unlike the last two times, however, we didn’t have tickets. Luaus – especially those run by hotels – are usually pretty expensive and time consuming. Yes, the food and performances are amazing, but that may not be what you want after being out adventuring all day. Instead, we got back to our rooms, dropped our stuff, and tried to see what we could of the festivities. The luau was being performed near the pool area, which was almost directly beneath the balcony at the resort’s lobby. It wasn’t the perfect view, but we and a few others enjoyed the show. Once the sun set – making it easier for us to sneak around in the dark – we went downstairs and stood at the fringes of the luau. Everyone was done eating and too distracted by the performances to notice us. When the fire dancers came on for the finale, I put my camera’s rapid shot functions to good use. Stay tuned for some awesome fire photos!

After spending all day in the southeast, we decided to go in almost the opposite direction the next day. Compared to the previous freeway, Interstate H-2 was pretty unremarkable; narrower roads, more traffic, and farmland that stretched for miles. However, said farmland was owned by one of the biggest tourist attractions in Hawaii: the Dole Plantation. If you’ve ever eaten a pineapple in America, it’s probably come from this place. Their products are admittedly delicious, though I never imagined the plantation being so popular. Stepping inside the shop was like visiting a Disney store, except everything is white and yellow, and there are no creepy mascots. Any memorabilia remotely related to pineapples was contained in this one building. Sauces, dips, jams, shirts, stuffed animals, beer, key chains, magnets, coffee, water bottles, ice cream, chocolate, candy, knives, tacky magnets, Christmas ornaments…It was all there, overpriced and ripe for eager tourists’ picking. The line for the ice cream was ridiculous, but I managed to watch and partake in a live pineapple dessert demonstration. Fresh, diced pineapple sprinkled with plum extract tastes even better than it sounds.

We spent a little time roaming the grounds, looking at the various pineapple species growing on display. I never knew there were so many different types; the red-tinged ananas comosus looked especially fascinating. We didn’t bother taking the famed Pineapple Express; it was far too expensive, and we had plenty left on our schedule. We picnicked near the plantation’s parking lot, then headed for the next major stop of the day: Waimea Valley, a tropical park filled with unusual plants, ruins, hiking trails, birds, and a waterfall. By the time we got there, the skies were an ominous gray. That’s the thing about traveling to Hawaii; you can never be quite sure when those looming clouds will turn on you. Sure enough, it started pouring when we’d completed about 90% of the walk to Waimea Falls. We tried waiting out the rain by seeking shelter and having some snacks – this was my first time trying shaved ice – but it was to no avail. I covered my camera and made a break for the falls. Much like Manoa Falls a few days prior, this was kind of underwhelming. It didn’t have the height or splendor to make it really stand out, but it did have a massive swimming area. Several tourists ignored the rain, stripped down, and jumped in. I finally got a chance to make use of my new tripod as well; expect a lovely water-in-motion shot in the near future.

The return walk was mostly uneventful. Waimea Valley’s main walking area is actually paved and mostly flat, making it an easy trip back to the entrance. You can even take a shuttle to and from both ends, though it costs extra. Instead, we took our time wandering the branching paths, enjoying the exotic flowers and numerous bird species. Fun fact: peacocks generally have no problem being photographed. It’s almost as if they enjoy showing off for the camera. But if you hang around too long or close, they’ll lose their patience and honk until you go away. You’d never expect anything so beautiful to be so headache-inducingly loud.

By the time we left, it was already late in the afternoon. We had a couple of options: We could 1) keep driving north and swing around Kawela Bay, Laie, and eventually loop onto H-3 on the far side of the island or 2) Head back southwest the way we came and have dinner in Haleiwa. At that point we were pretty well worn out, so we decided to play it safe with the second option. This also had an important side benefit; we’d be driving by Laniakea Beach, homeland of Oahu’s famous turtle population. However, the exact location is kept secret; it’s not precisely pinpointed on Google maps, and most people we asked were rather reticent. At one point we pulled over at a lookout, and I walked almost a mile alongside the highway (with no sidewalks, in the rain), before realizing we were still too far off. Once we finally narrowed the location down, we found that there was no parking. Instead, there were construction signs and cones everywhere (though no workers), no place to pull over, and two police squad cars guarding the area. I guess the Hawaiian government really doesn’t want people messing with their turtles. Which is understandable; they are an endangered species, and people could mess up their habitat. I just wish there was an easier, but still legal way to get them on film.

We gave up on the turtles and drove into Haleiwa. We went in almost completely blind; all we knew was that it was a smaller town with a lot of local restaurants. After watching the rain pour into the mountains west of Haleiwa Beach Park (which was far less scenic than those on the eastern side of the island), we came across the Kua Aina Sandwich Shop, a famous – but relatively small – Americana food chain. Though they started in Hawaii, they spread to London and Tokyo. Their success was no coincidence; their dishes are made with fresh ingredients, from the mahi-mahi to the roasted peppers. After having their pineapple/tomato/lettuce/grilled onion burger, I can safely say that Kua Aina trounces every fast food place here in California. Sorry In & Out, but you’ve been outdone. We finished out meal and spent a few minutes exploring the area (including the Rainbow Bridge, the historical importance of which I didn’t know of at the time), then made the long drive back down south.

The next day, we decided to keep things a little closer to home. Our first destination was the Wahiawa Botanical Garden, which we passed beforehand en route to the Dole Plantation. After enjoying Waimea Valley so much, visiting another nature reserve seemed like a good idea. And it was…for the most part. It felt far smaller and more claustrophobic; exhibits seemed to be more clumped together instead of having a sleeker presentation. On the other hand, this felt more like a hike; the trails weren’t paved, the vegetation was thicker, and it actually felt like we were hiking in the rainforest again, even though city streets and houses were just beyond the tree line. It was also incredibly quiet; aside from us, the only other visitors were a small Japanese tour group. After getting our fill of unusual plants (including a yellow bamboo thicket and a multi-colored Mindanao gum tree), we had to decide on our next destination. We could try heading back up north go past where we went yesterday, or we could go back towards Kapolei and drive up the west coast of the island. Since it was raining all over the island that day, we decided not to press our luck and went with the latter.

Now, you might be wondering why we had to drive back down to Kapolei to reach the west coast. Couldn’t we have just driven northwest, then through Haleiwa, and go back down? Here’s the thing: the northwestern tip of Oahu is called Kaena Point, and it’s not a paved road. You either have to hike it or have an authorized vehicle to make it around the bend. Instead, we took the long way by driving from the southeast, all the way up to the very end of Highway 93. It was a lovely drive, even if it was fraught with rain and local traffic. The lush mountain landscapes on this side of the island were absolutely gorgeous, even with the overcast sky. As we neared the end of the road, we didn’t expect to find anything or be able to enjoy the beach. However, Mother Nature decided to cut us a break; when we rolled into Yokohama Bay, we discovered that it was the only sunny spot in Oahu for several miles. Several others had caught on, too. We saw the locals setting up picnics, fishing, surfing, and just enjoying the scenery. I didn’t bother with the Kaena Point Trail; the recent downpour had left it thick with fresh mud. Instead, I spent time walking along the coastline, capturing the huge waves as they crashed into the nearby tide pools. We stayed their until dinnertime, then reluctantly headed back south. We’d taken a chance driving up here, and it paid off immensely.

On our final full day in Oahu, we decided to cram in as many last minute things as we feasibly could. The weather was on our side; not only was it a clear day, but it was brutally hot. It’s as if Mother Nature was trying to make up for lost time. We set off early, spending a short while at Aulani, the famous Disney resort next door. The hotel people have this thing down to a science: Non-guests are permitted 30 minutes to park in the garage and explore the grounds. You’re given a ticket stub programmed with the time you’re supposed to leave. If you stay too long, you’ll need to shell out $12. However, if you stay and have a meal (minimum $35), you’re allowed to stay as long as you want. We practically sprinted through the main area, just long enough to snag photos of the famous lobby (you know exactly what I’m talking about if you watch Wheel of Fortune), the koi pond, pool area, and even with Mickey Mouse himself. We dashed back to the car and tried to exit…but the automated ticket machine at the exit wouldn’t let us out. After trying multiple times to get through, I buzzed the staff on the machine’s intercom and not-quite shouted until they opened up. That was by far the most stressful Disney-related experience I’ve ever had.

Our next stop was Hanauma Bay, which was in the far southeast. We’d have to drive from one end of Interstate H-1 to the other, slogging through traffic and praying that we’d be able to get in. See, Hanauma Bay isn’t just another beach; it was recently voted as the #1 Beach in America. No, seriously. That really happened. It’s got got a beautiful – if relatively narrow – stretch of white sand, clear water, coral reefs, and epic cliff landscapes overlooking on both sides. It’s also an excellent marine nature preserve; you have to watch an educational video about interacting with animals and preserving their habitats. Needless to say, this place is very popular. In fact, we weren’t able to get inside the first time; we were turned away by a staff member who blandly waved us past and back onto the highway.

Feeling defeated, I took out the map and began scouring for places to visit so the drive out there wouldn’t become a total waste. I ended up settling on the Koko Crater Stairs, a nearby hike infamous for its simple, but grueling workout. The trail is comprised of a single, straight line made up of an old rail road track. You just have to keep walking forward, and you’ll reach the end eventually. However, said ending is over 1,200 feet above sea level. Each railroad tie is like an old, dusty step on a staircase that stretches almost to the horizon. I felt confident in tackling it…only to realize that the narrow path was jammed with weekend athletes, tourists, and children. By the time I made it halfway up, I realized it’d take too long to get back down. Then the midday heat set in, and I knew this hike wasn’t going to happen. This was my last day on Oahu; did I really want to spend it suffering from heat exhaustion? I promptly turned around, snapped a few landscape shots, and climbed down.

Turns out my timing was impeccable; when we returned to Hanauma Bay, there was more than enough parking available. The trip from the entrance down to the beach was a small hike in itself; the trail was paved, but pretty steep. People could even pay extra and have a cart drive them down, though most went on foot. Hanauma Bay reminded me of Waikiki, just with smaller waves and less people. More animals, too; parts of the beach are home to stray cats and even a few mongooses. While I didn’t go snorkeling – you have to pay extra for the gear, of course – I spent most of the time wading into the beautiful, clear water and getting some great photos. It felt like I was living in the cover of Final Fantasy X. I walked from one of the beach to the other, enjoying what little time I had left in Hawaii.

It was so good, we actually lost track of time. When we climbed back up to the parking lot, it was already in the late afternoon. We had originally planned to save Diamond Head for our very last hike, but there would be no way to reach it before the trail closed for the night. Also, a massive rain cloud was looming right over the area, which would’ve spoiled the view regardless. This was another lesson that I still constantly need to remind myself: It’s impossible to see and do everything in one go. Even with all the planning, even with being in perfect health, sometimes things just don’t work out, and you need to save it for next time. Whenever I travel, I always assume that I’ll never make it back on another trip; it keeps me motivated and busy. But it also leaves me frustrated when I can’t quite pull off everything I plan. Call it a character flaw, hubris, whatever. I spent my last night on the island satisfied, but still wishing to see so much more.

The trip back to California was uneventful, for which I am very grateful. Lost luggage, local protests, and other problems are recurring issues on our Hawaii trips, but this one went almost perfectly. The only snag was getting through security; there was only one aged, lethargic fellow looking at everyone’s paperwork for Hawaiian Airlines, which dragged the wait time to a grueling 45-minute crawl. We made it to the terminal with enough time to refill water bottles and use the restroom, but nothing else. I had a window seat, and I fully intended to take plenty of awesome skyscape shots during the flight back. I didn’t realize how exhausted I was; less than an hour in, and I was deep in sleep. I woke up just in time to take a few unsatisfying night shots of the Bay Area, then resigned myself to the baggage claim, chilly air, and train commute back into San Francisco.

I was finally back, just in time for summer.

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BRB, Going To Hawaii Again…Again!

Hey, folks. If you’ve been following me on social media, you might have noticed I’ve been hinting at my next trip. By the time this posts, I’ll be on a plane headed for Oahu. Yeah, you might recall that I’ve been to Hawaii a couple of times, but this will be my first visit to this particular island. I’m definitely excited for it; it may not be the grand, epic quest that was the Mediterranean (which I’m still writing about, don’t worry!), but I’m immensely grateful to go on another adventure out in the Pacific. Each island is different, after all. Judging from what I’ve read thus far, there is going to be a lot of hiking this time around, which is right up my alley. I’m also taking a new lens, tripod, and a few filters along this time. Expect some awesome photos when I get back.

See you in June!

Two Weeks In Europe: Day 1 – Leaving On A Train, Then Jet Plane

What would become the greatest trip of my life started as a complete coincidence. It was early in 2015, and I’d already thought my travel plans were set for the year; I’d have a week in Mexico, and that would be it. However, my mother called me unexpectedly one afternoon, saying that she’d come across a flyer for the Royal Caribbean cruise line. She’d been considering Greece – this was long before the refugee crisis became headlines here in the States – but decided on something far grander: a two week trip with stops in Spain, France, Italy, and Montenegro. We’d been to this part of Europe before (years before I owned a digital camera, sadly!), but never to Barcelona or Nice. I’ve always been a huge history and art geek, so I was immediately hooked on the prospect of seeing Rome and Venice. Mom had actually been trying for almost a decade to get a trip booked for Rome via her timeshare, but couldn’t get anything in the city itself. This cruise seemed like a feasible way for her to tackle her bucket list, and we wanted to travel together while she was still capable of doing so. So, we made arrangements and marked our calendars.

Skip forward about 6 months (the Mexico trip in June is a story for another time), to the morning of October 18th. I’d slept at Mom’s place overnight – amazing how the living room sofa felt better than my old bed – because we had to leave the house before dawn. Instead of driving to SFO, we stuck with what’s become our go-to option: taking BART train line all the way to the airport. It’s easy to navigate, cheaper than a shuttle, and you don’t have to worry about parking. Assuming there are no malfunctions, protests, or police activity (which all happened coming back from Hawaii last December), it’s a smooth, straightforward trip. It’s just a long ride from our starting point, almost from one end of the line to the other. It feels even longer when you’re still half asleep, shivering in the cold, and hauling 50 lbs of your mom’s luggage onto the platform. We took the first SFO-bound train of the day, and were surprised to find at least two dozen other travelers along for the ride. Any Bay Area commuter knows that getting a seat on BART during the busy hours is like a competitive sport; it’s all about positioning yourself in the crowd and seizing opportunities – and vacant chairs – with keen observation and timing. I usually stand during my daily commutes, but going to the airport is different. We tried getting the coveted senior priority seats (there’s more open space for our bags), but ended up sitting across the aisle from each other.

After about an hour of struggling to stay awake while keeping the bags standing and out of people’s way, we finally made it to the airport. Finding the terminal was easy, but the actual ticket counter was something else. We thought our flight was with United Airlines; it said so in nice, big letters on our printout. However, we failed to read the fine print: the plane belonged to United, but the flight itself was being operated by Air Canada. Cue us wasting about half an hour wandering through the terminal and getting incorrect directions from every information desk. Finally getting our luggage checked was a huge relief, both physically and mentally. Getting through security was surprisingly easy this time, too; I’m one of those unfortunate folks who seem to be a magnet for the TSA. It’s probably the suspiciously long, beautiful hair. Aside from her purse, Mom was toting a large bag full of food and her medications. She was diagnosed with diabetes last year – she carries around the doctor’s note to prove it to the authorities – but it always strikes me funny how she’s able to get several meals’ worth of snacks, cereal, and veggies past security. The most I bring are a couple packages of crackers and two refillable water bottles. With the hardest part out of the way, we had a little less than two hours to kick back and wait.

We weren’t flying straight to Spain, though. We had to fly to Montreal, then make a connection. It’s pretty standard fare…except that there was only 30 minutes between flights. When I wasn’t distracted by the movies (I got to watch Jurassic World, Inside Out, and Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol. Reviews coming soon!), I pondered over the logistics of our layover. 30 minutes to disembark the plane, get through customs/security, and find a gate in an airport that I’d never seen before. Yeah, it was going to be messy. Air Canada was well aware of our problem; when we landed in Montreal, they announced that the people with close connecting flights – less than a dozen of us in total – were allowed to disembark first. They were even good enough to find out what gate we needed. Mom and I bolted and got through security quickly – they have a small booth off to the side just for connections – and rushed to the next gate.

But there was no plane.

I checked my watch. No, we had at least another 15 minutes. There’s no way it could’ve left. I went to the flight listing display and searched for ours. Lo and behold, it was still at the airport, but at a different gate, in the opposite direction that we’d come. The Air Canada crew had outdated information. Because it couldn’t be that easy, right? Mom and I nearly sprinted to the correct gate, only to find that they’d been delayed and had just started boarding. We scrambled into the line and got on without any problems. As I sank wearily into my seat and buckled up, I closed my eyes and tried to rub my headache away. We’d been traveling for over 12 hours straight across multiple time zones, and we’d made a connection that, in normal circumstances, should’ve been nearly impossible. Once dinner and drinks had been served – apple juice is my beverage of choice when flying – I tried settling back and sleeping. Time passes strangely on overnight flights; with the windows shuttered and lighting inconsistent, it’s impossible to tell what time it is without looking at a phone or watch. And when you’ve been on your feet for so long, your energy and circadian rhythm are all out of sorts. I think I slept, but I’ve blacked out on flights before. I was more worried about Mom; her endurance isn’t as strong as it used to be. She spent most of the flight trying to find a good sleeping position – often using my shoulder as a pillow – but with little results.

Eventually, someone pulled up a shutter, revealing that the sun was already out. I’d lost track of the night at some point, but that didn’t matter. The captain announced that we were within an hour of Barcelona, the port where we’d board the cruise. I rubbed my eyes and shared some bread with Mom. At this point, we’d been traveling for over 24 hours straight. My head was pounding, but I had to focus on what was coming next. Disembarking. Finding our luggage. Hopefully none of it got lost in transit like the last time we were in Spain. Finding the airport-to-ship shuttle service we’d reserved in advance. We were almost an hour late, hopefully they were still waiting for us. Boarding the ship. What did that entail? So many questions, so little time.

Continued in Day 2…

Two Weeks On The Mediterranean: An Introduction

Hey, folks. I’m baaaaaaack…

*Crickets chirp*

…Ahem. If you recall, I recently left a message saying I’d be going on an epic adventure in Europe, and that I’d be gone till November. And that’s exactly what I did; I spent the latter half of October on the Vision of the Seas, a Royal Caribbean cruise ship. I’d never done a cruise before, so the fast pace and logistics involved were completely new for me. It was well worth the effort, though. Throughout the last two weeks, I visited Spain, France, Italy, Vatican City, and Montenegro (and Germany, but that was just a layover, so that doesn’t really count). I got to explore Barcelona, Villefranche, Nice, Pisa, Rome, St. Peter’s, Salerno, Pompeii, Venice, Kotor, Risan, and Perast. I saw tons of stuff, celebrated my birthday at St. Mark’s, and took just over 4,500 photos.

Yeah, I’ve been kind of busy.

I’m going to be sharing all of my experiences with you, but definitely not in a single huge post. This travel memoir will be written to cover one day at a time, and likely posted with the same frequency. I seriously can’t wait to show you the sheer awesomeness of the Mediterranean, and I hope it’ll inspire you to travel and seek out your own adventures!

Stay tuned, folks.

BRB, Going To Europe

Hey, folks. Hope your autumn is going well so far! I’m currently packed up and about to head out for yet another epic adventure. In terms of sheer number of places and pacing, this is the biggest trip I’ve ever taken…and that’s saying something. Unlike the last time I was in Europe, I have a decent camera! I won’t say where – it’s better left as a surprise – but I’ve been occasionally dropping hints on social media for a while now. Let’s just say that there will be many, many photos and stories coming soon. In the meantime, the blog is going to be hiatus starting from tomorrow through the end of this month. As Wyclef Jean once sang, I’ll be gone till November. Have a great, safe October, folks. I’ll be back.

Selling Vintage Comic Books. Help?

Hey, folks. This is just a little behind-the-scenes post. I found a stash of a relative’s old comic books this morning. Nearly all of them are from the early 60s-late seventies; so far I’ve found issues covering Sgt. Rock, GI Combat, Detective Comics, Lone Ranger, Popeye, and some Hanna-Barbera stuff. Most of them are in pretty bad condition, but at least 10-15 are still in plastic. We want to sell it online, but have zero experience with it. Can anyone recommend a reliable site or service that handles that kind of thing, or should I just go into the proverbial rabbit hole with eBay?

Thanks in advance.

RIP, Monty Oum

Today, it was announced that Monty Oum passed away. For those unfamiliar with his work, he was the mind behind web animation series such as Haloid, Dead Fantasy, Red vs Blue, and RWBY. He wasn’t just some random YouTube personality; in an Internet full of creative people struggling to be heard, he was one of the few who really showed what could be done with hard work, dedication, and ideas. He set an example that others should strive for. I’m not going to pretend that I knew him, but I understood and agreed with his world view. His work was awesome and inspiring. I wish I had some funny story about meeting him at a convention, or that I could’ve had the chance to collaborate with him on a project. But I don’t.

And now I never will.

What I can do, however, is follow the Rooster Teeth crew’s advice and do something creative. I’ve been a fan of RWBY since its debut (think Harry Potter meets Final Fantasy by way of Wuxia) , and I had originally intended to do a review log of every episode as a lead-in to the Season 3 premiere in July. But now, I think I’ll move it up in my schedule. February is already going to be a busy in terms of gaming and reading, but I’m sure I can fit the reviews somewhere in there. In the meantime, I’ll just end this with an old quote from Monty himself: “Never let anyone tell you that something is impossible.”

Godspeed.