A List Of Mementos: A Work In Progress

A List Of Mementos: A Work In Progress

  • A finger painting of a clown, to remind me of where I began.
  • A bachelor’s degree, to remind me of what it means to overcome.
  • A chess set, to remind me why I love strategy.
  • A Galileo thermometer, to remind me of my inspiration.
  • A bottle of sparkling cider, to remind me to appreciate family while you can.
  • A glass sailboat, to remind me that the best memories are timeless.
  • A lanyard, to remind me that honesty and persuasion can work wonders.
  • An iPod that says Non sum qualis eram, to remind me to accept change.
  • A Necronomicon, to remind me why I love horror.
  • A copy of The Dictionary of Imaginary Places, to remind me to keep dreaming.
  • A puka shell necklace, to remind me of the spirit of Aloha.
  • A cave painting charm, to remind me to keep exploring.
  • An old walking stick, to remind me of the mountains I’ve climbed.
  • A stamp from 10,000 ft. up, to remind me that the climb is just as important as the view.
  • A miniature anchor, to remind me to keep taking chances.
  • A miniature gilded elephant, to remind me to seek opportunities.
  • A miniature Eiffel Tower, to remind me that some things are worth the wait.
  • A cable car ticket stub, to remind me some things aren’t.
  • A scorpion in plexiglass, to remind me of places to which I’ll never return.
  • A wooden Mayan charm on a string, to remind me what heat and time truly feel like.
  • A pewter Majora’s Mask, to remind me why video games are art after all.
  • A set of pins, to remind me to share my passion for literature.
  • A LEGO Hamlet, to remind me why I love being a geek.
  • A Hello Kitty Chun-Li, to remind me that I should accept all aspects of myself.
  • A pair of Buddhist prayer bead bracelets, to remind me to stay curious.

Freshly Pressed Gratitude

Hey, folks. It’s been a cold but wonderful Friday. This morning, I was shocked to discover that my narrative about San Francisco’s Market Street was chosen for the Freshly Pressed page:

There it is, third on the top row. I never expected my post to make it that far, let alone for it to be noticed by so many people! I’m still quite new at this whole blogging thing – I only started posting here a little over a month ago – so I’m immensely grateful that people are reading and enjoying my work. I don’t think it can be fully articulated in words. You guys give me a reason to believe that what I’m doing has meaning, that I’m not just blindly wandering the abyss that is the Internet. As long as you keep reading, I’ll keep writing. I stand by what I wrote in my profile. The world is full of incredible, awe-inspiring things; most just goes unnoticed. I’ll share what I find, and maybe we’ll all learn something along the way. I never lost my sense of wonder.

I hope you haven’t, either.

PS. By the way, I actually did run into the Buddhist monk again just a few days ago. Twice in one afternoon, in fact! I had left the prayer beads at home – I was running late for the train that morning – but he recognized me the second time. Probably because I was wearing a huge scarf and my hair was going all Medusa-style in the wind. The language barrier was still a problem, but I made sure to give him the proper greeting. Palms clasped, head tilted forward. No camera, indeed. He just returned my smile and nodded, and we parted ways. Good to know the old-fashioned ways still work. I’ll probably run into him again next week. As for you, see you tomorrow…Or later today. Whichever comes first.

Weekly Writing Challenge: Snapshots, Or: Buddhism On Market Street

http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/12/02/weekly-writing-challenge-snapshots/

It’s cold. Not freezing, but it’s getting there. If I return to this street a month from now, it probably will be. San Francisco’s Financial District never changes. Oh sure, the stores change. But the people don’t. It’s the same crowd shifting and flowing down Market Street’s dingy sidewalks. The overbearing smell of McDonald’s breakfasts wafting out a sliding door. A group of guys in jeans and dreadlocks selling rap CDs outside of Walgreens. A hundred people wait at the crosswalk. The pressure is immense; you can get crushed within this mass of flesh and fabric. Eyes on the signs and opportunities, friends and lovers and coworkers chatting. A businessman speaking Spanish into a cell phone, loudly. Two Japanese school kids, busily texting with heads downcast. Hands shoved into coat pockets, scarves hiding visible breaths. I can hear the drum players over by Kearny, their music surging forth on the wind. A man with a microphone singing 80s R&B. A fashionista strutting by in some kind of black blouse/skirt/boots ensemble. She looks beautiful, but impractical. This isn’t the place for a pseudo-catwalk. A young girl stares wonderingly into the entrance of the Ghirardelli shop, desperately hoping her parents will let her get lost amid the mountains of desserts. The request is denied; she is escorted hand-held from the building.

It’s too early for chocolate.

The light is about to change. Drivers make a break for the yellow light, and most of them succeed. Horns blare, deafening and annoying. The engines snarl and sputter, and people are already entering the crosswalk. Idiots, wait for the signal! How many pedestrian casualties happen just within this little chunk of the city? But no one cares; they just have to make it to their destination as quickly as possible. People ignore their mortality until hits them in the face; inevitability can’t be denied. One last straggling driver makes it past the light, but gets stuck in the crosswalk. Dark green SUV, driver with shades and a blue-tooth. She’s sipping her coffee, barely masking the frustration bursting from every immaculate pore. None of us skips a beat; the pedestrians leave the safety of the century-old curb. We surround and pass the SUV like water over a rock; it’s nothing but terrain. The wind picks up between buildings, and I get half a mouthful of my hair. It’s okay, at least it’s not raining yet.

A glance into a Starbucks window reveals a wonderful but slightly sickening setting. Every seat in the place is occupied, mostly students with laptops. We’re just a stone’s throw away from Academy of Art University, after all. Not a single spot for someone to just sit down and take a minute to get out of the cold. Or meet the love of your life, like in countless romantic comedies. It must be sweltering in there. No, stay out. There’s like 20 people in line, and they probably won’t even let you use the restroom unless you buy something. Save your money. Keep walking, buddy, nothing to see here.

The sidewalk on the corner of Market and 4th turns from gray to red. I’m not sure if it’s actual brick, or just painted. It’s a nice aesthetic choice, considering it’s in front of the Old Navy flagship store. Dozens of people flock through its multiple double doors, seeking savings on bland but comfortable clothing. I’m not even inside, and I can hear the pop music blaring out of the speakers. The employees must despise it. Assuming they haven’t gone deaf yet, of course. A row of flags mounted on the front facade dance and flap with the breeze, mesmerizing passersby like a siren’s song. Mannequins pose dramatically as they sell the latest (at least in the current cycle) styles. A young, smiling greeter is placed strategically at the center of the entrance, handing out information on the latest sale. Our eyes and polite smiles meet for a second, but no more.

It’s an unspoken understanding that this particular corner is a place to visit. It’s partly due to being the location of a popular store, but it’s more than that. It’s like a market condensed into only a few dozen square feet. Vendors sell cheap trinkets and hats next to the curb. Fake jewelry, key chains, knitted Pokemon knock-offs. A guy in a deliberately tacky red suit is selling balloon animals; a schoolkid walks away with a latex sword. BART and MUNI subway riders arise from the depths close by. A line of people, mostly tourists and college kids, shiver as they wait for the oncoming trolley. A homeless man – one of hundreds just in this area – leans against the exterior of the building, bearing only a torn, grimy brown sweatshirt and faded jeans. A cardboard sign and a 7-11 cup in hand. Eyes downcast, arms raised in supplication. No one notices. Even the young kids out on winter break just sidestep him. His odor is masked by the sheer stench of grayish smoke puffing and billowing out of a sewer grate next to the crosswalk. I walk too close to a couple of girls in matching blue t-shirts, and they give me a pamphlet offering personality tests. I nod politely and pocket it.

I’ve been this exact moment so many times, it’s maddening.

But here’s something I wasn’t expecting: the Buddhist Monk! No, I’m not making this up; he’s one of the many, many wanderers unique to this part of the city. Tall, saffron robe, sandals, shaved head, attentive eyes, early 30s. Must be freezing. Reminds me of my visit to Wat Chalong Temple in 2012, though this setting is far less dignified. He’s walking slowly up Market Street, nodding eagerly and trying to interact with everyone. Of course, he’s being ignored; people either walk around or dismiss him with a hand wave. But I recognize this guy. He gave me prayer beads and a shiny Guanyin decal a month ago. He even showed me pictures of his temple! I want to thank him for out last encounter. I want to say how awesome I think he is, how much I appreciate him sharing just a tiny fraction of his world with those around them. I want him to know that at least one person in this seemingly endless expanse of humanity, there is at least one person who acknowledges him as an individual. I walk up to him and grin.

Eye contact mired by confusion. He doesn’t recognize me. We don’t speak the same languages. Gah, if only I had brought the prayer beads with me! Maybe the next time we meet…But not now, not this failed attempt. People pass us by without a glance; we’re holding up the flow. We hold each others’ gazes for a few awkward seconds, and I try to salvage the exchange with a picture. He smiles kindly and responds:

“No camera.”